Albion's seed : four British folkways in America / by David Hackett Fischer.

By: Fischer, David Hackett, 1935-Series: Fischer, David Hackett, America, a cultural history: v. 1.Publication details: New York : Oxford University Press, 1989Description: xxi, 946 p. : ill., maps ; 25 cmISBN: 0195037944 (alk. paper); 9780195037944 (alk. paper)Subject(s): Culturele invloeden | United States -- Civilization -- To 1783 | United States -- Civilization -- English influences | États-Unis -- Civilisation -- Jusqu'à 1783 | États-Unis -- Civilisation -- Influence anglaise | Civilization | United StatesLOC classification: E169.1 | .F539 1989 vol. 1 | E162Other classification: 15.85 Online resources: Table of contents only | Publisher description | Contributor biographical information
Contents:
Preface: An idea of cultural history -- Introduction: The determinants of a voluntary society -- East Anglia to Massachusetts: the exodus of the English Puritans, 1629-41 -- The south of England to Virginia: distressed cavaliers and indentured servants, 1642-75 -- North Midlands to the Delaware: the Friend's migration, 1675-1725 -- Borderlands to the backcountry: the flight from North Britain, 1717-1775 -- Conclusion: Four British folkways in American history: the origin and persistence of regional cultures in the United States.
Item type Home library Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book Book Evangelische Theologische Faculteit Leuven
Main Library
E 169.2 FISC 1989 (Browse shelf (Opens below)) Available 35678000274573

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Preface: An idea of cultural history -- Introduction: The determinants of a voluntary society -- East Anglia to Massachusetts: the exodus of the English Puritans, 1629-41 -- The south of England to Virginia: distressed cavaliers and indentured servants, 1642-75 -- North Midlands to the Delaware: the Friend's migration, 1675-1725 -- Borderlands to the backcountry: the flight from North Britain, 1717-1775 -- Conclusion: Four British folkways in American history: the origin and persistence of regional cultures in the United States.