God's crucible : Islam and the making of Europe, 570-1215 / David Levering Lewis.

By: Lewis, David L, 1936-Publication details: New York ; London : W. W. Norton, 2009Description: xxv, 473 p., [8] p. of plates : ill., maps ; 21 cmISBN: 9780393333565 (pbk.); 0393333566 (pbk.)Subject(s): Civilization, Medieval | Europe -- History -- 476-1492 | Europe -- Civilization -- Islamic influences
Contents:
The superpowers -- "The Arabs are coming!" -- "Jihad!" -- The co-opted caliphate and the stumbling Jihad -- The year 711 -- Picking up the pieces after Rome -- The myth of Poitiers -- The fall and rise of the Umayyads -- Saving the popes -- An empire of force and faith -- Carolingian Jihads: Roncesvalles and Saxony -- The great mosque -- The first Europe, briefly -- Equipoise--delicate and doomed -- Disequilibrium Pelayo's revenge -- Knowledge transmitted, rationalism repudiated: Ibn Rushd and Musa ibn Maymun.
Summary: In this panoramic history of Islamic culture in early Europe, a Pulitzer Prize winning historian re-examines what we thought we knew. Lewis reveals how cosmopolitan, Muslim al-Andalus flourished--a beacon of cooperation and tolerance between Islam, Judaism, and Christianity--while proto-Europe made virtues out of hereditary aristocracy, religious intolerance, perpetual war, and slavery.--From publisher description.
Item type Home library Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book Book Evangelische Theologische Faculteit Leuven
Main Library
D 117 LEWI 2008 (Browse shelf (Opens below)) Available 35678000298549

Includes bibliographical references (p. 439-448) and index.

The superpowers -- "The Arabs are coming!" -- "Jihad!" -- The co-opted caliphate and the stumbling Jihad -- The year 711 -- Picking up the pieces after Rome -- The myth of Poitiers -- The fall and rise of the Umayyads -- Saving the popes -- An empire of force and faith -- Carolingian Jihads: Roncesvalles and Saxony -- The great mosque -- The first Europe, briefly -- Equipoise--delicate and doomed -- Disequilibrium Pelayo's revenge -- Knowledge transmitted, rationalism repudiated: Ibn Rushd and Musa ibn Maymun.

In this panoramic history of Islamic culture in early Europe, a Pulitzer Prize winning historian re-examines what we thought we knew. Lewis reveals how cosmopolitan, Muslim al-Andalus flourished--a beacon of cooperation and tolerance between Islam, Judaism, and Christianity--while proto-Europe made virtues out of hereditary aristocracy, religious intolerance, perpetual war, and slavery.--From publisher description.